Ing (*Ing)

Old English Modern English
Name Ing Frēa Ing1I do not recommend continuing Frēa (> *Frea /fɹiː/), as the title fully disappeared from the language and was supplanted by just lord. If it is used, then *Frea must go before Ing due to a reordering of where titles go in Modern English.
Pronunciation /iŋɡ fræ:a/ /ɪŋ/
Etymology Ing: from Proto-Germanic *Ingwaz. Cognate with Old Norse Yngvi.

Frēa “lord”: from Proto-Germanic *frawjô “lord” or *frauwaz “lord”. Cognate with Old Saxon frao or frōio, Old High German frō (earlier *frōjo), and Gothic frauja. Proto-Germanic *fraujaz yielded Old Norse freyr “lord”, also the name of the god.

The name “Ing Frēa” is not attested within Old English as a single name, but appears separately as Ing and Frēa in different locations. If not for Freyr in Norse mythology, Frēa would not have been a word of interest at all.2Stephen Pollington, The Elder Gods: The Otherworld of Early England (2011) pg. 234 The combination of name and title is attested in Old Norse.3Ynglinga saga 12.

He is the son of Mannus and gave his name to the Ingaevones4Tacitus, Germania. Chapter two., who would later be the Angles, Saxons, Frisians, and Jutes. This may be the basis for the later Old English name Ingwine “friends of Ing”.5Stephen Pollington, The Elder Gods: The Otherworld of Early England (2011) pg. 252 In Beowulf, Hrōþgār, a Dane, is named frēan Ingwine “lord of the Ingwins”6Beowulf, line 1319., which may have implied other religious connotations that are lost to us now.7Stephen Pollington, The Elder Gods: The Otherworld of Early England (2011) pg. 252 In Norse mythology, he is typically considered the son of Njǫrðr8Snorri Sturluson, Gylfaginning 24., who is unattested in Anglo-Saxon mythology.

He is a phallic fertility god and associated with peace, pleasure, sunshine, crops, and prosperity.9Snorri Sturluson, Ynglinga saga 12. 10Adam of Bremen, Gesta Hammaburgensis ecclesiae pontificum 26. 11Snorri Sturluson, Gylfaginning 24. His preferred sacrificial offerings were to be dark in colour12Saxo Grammaticus, Gesta Danorum book 1. This translation uses “dusky”., which is similar to the black animals used in Greek sacrificial offerings for chthonic deities.13Jon D. Mikalson, Ancient Greek Religion pg. 37 He is also associated with the elves14Grímnismál 5 and wagons15Ögmundar þáttr dytts. Link is in the Modern Icelandic spelling., the latter of which is echoed in the Anglo-Saxon rune poem:

[Ing] wæs ærest mid Ēastdenum
gesewen secgum oþ he sīþþan ēast
ofer wæg gewāt wæn æfter ran
þus Heardingas þone hæle nemdon

[Ing] was first among the East Danes
seen by men until later eastwards he
went over the waves; his wagon ran after.
Thus the Hardings named the hero.

Of potential interest, the wagon was also associated with Nerthus in the late first century.16Tacitus, Germania. Chapter forty.

Footnotes   [ + ]

1. I do not recommend continuing Frēa (> *Frea /fɹiː/), as the title fully disappeared from the language and was supplanted by just lord. If it is used, then *Frea must go before Ing due to a reordering of where titles go in Modern English.
2. Stephen Pollington, The Elder Gods: The Otherworld of Early England (2011) pg. 234
3. Ynglinga saga 12.
4. Tacitus, Germania. Chapter two.
5. Stephen Pollington, The Elder Gods: The Otherworld of Early England (2011) pg. 252
6. Beowulf, line 1319.
7. Stephen Pollington, The Elder Gods: The Otherworld of Early England (2011) pg. 252
8. Snorri Sturluson, Gylfaginning 24.
9. Snorri Sturluson, Ynglinga saga 12.
10. Adam of Bremen, Gesta Hammaburgensis ecclesiae pontificum 26.
11. Snorri Sturluson, Gylfaginning 24.
12. Saxo Grammaticus, Gesta Danorum book 1. This translation uses “dusky”.
13. Jon D. Mikalson, Ancient Greek Religion pg. 37
14. Grímnismál 5
15. Ögmundar þáttr dytts. Link is in the Modern Icelandic spelling.
16. Tacitus, Germania. Chapter forty.